Episode 1 of the Student Radio History Podcast. Pirate Radio 3DR – Make Radio Not War

⬇ ⬇ ⬇ PODCAST LINK ⬇ ⬇ ⬇

http://ow.ly/805z50yl4Ym

Pirate Radio 3DR – Make Radio Not War, Episode 1 of the Student Radio History Podcast. As a sort of accident, this illegal station became Australia’s biggest pirate radio project in history. There have been small pirate radio projects before and after 3DR, but none as organised, as ambitious or as notorious as 3DR. This is the FIRST TIME this infamous story has been put together comprehensively and accurately.

In 1971, students and activists created 3DR Draft Resistance Radio created as part of a protest against the Vietnam War. This is the story of a group of young people inadvertently building the first community radio station in Australia.  

Get some radio in your life, listen to the podcast, and stay radical Australia!

IMAGE CREDIT – The Herald, 1 October 1971

Episode 1 Wrap – The Student Radio History Show

Thank you to everyone so much for tuning in, your feedback and your support for Episode 1 of the Student Radio History Show!

 Episode 1 discusses the pioneering PIRATE RADIO STATIONS of the early 70s in Melbourne, Victoria, and their influence on the radio projects of the future. Like a lot else in the early 70s, these stations were heavily political, and created as protests against the devastating Vietnam War. As Australia’s boldest pirate radio project, the influence of these pirates lived past the Vietnam War and influenced the creation of radical radio 3CR Community Radio and 4ZZZ 

For the majority of the show, I was so nervous I thought I’d die at any moment, and all the positive feedback has swelled my heart today like the Grinch at the end of that one movie.

The show will be podcasted post-haste, and should be available by the end of the week – I will post the link here and on studentradiohistory.com.au once it’s ready to go! The podcast will also include information on 3PR The People’s Radio at Monash University, which was not included in the live broadcast, as well as some extra interview audio.

Thank you to SYN for the platform. Thanks again to Juliet Fox and 3CR Community Radio, the National Film and Sound Archive of Australia for use of their audio and archival material, legends!

IMAGE 1 – My very own bit of student radio history, my DIY sign for the show last night, now officially archival material, torn at the corners in my haste to get out on time!

IMAGE 2 – The Age, 28 September 1971. Michael Matteson, Michael Hamel-Green, Tony Dalton and John Scott at the draft sanctuary at Melbourne University.

OUR FIRST INTERVIEW! Student Radio History on ArtSmitten SYN!

Interview with @artsmittensyn @synmedia available here http://ow.ly/AMbA50xjvSs

Great time thank you for having me! A small nervous breakdown prior to the interview was soothed by the gun Executive Producers, and the media blitz officially begins! If you’re a clever media person wanting some amazing content HMU for an interview about the project. The project is totally independent and totally self-published. Get some youth in your life! 🎙️🤘

#studentradio #youthmedia #communityradio #radio #media #attractiveyoungpeople #synmedia #podcast

John Maizels

Current SYNner Tom showing radio veteran of 40 years John Maizels how to speak into a microphone! Hahahaha. John was part of 3ST (SYN’s grandparent) in early 70s at RMIT. He cofounded the Monash student radio station, was a part of 3CT at Caulfield Tech, was one of the founding members of PBS and conducted the first test broadcast for 3CR. He joined the ArtSmitten team at SYN for an interview while he was in town for the CBAA conference. During the interview he recalls the time broadcast from inside the elevators on campus for 3ST, making him responsible for the the newspaper headline “Radio’s Rise and Fall”. Today, John is the president of Technorama and a community radio legend! Tom and Marcie co-host and co-produce ArtSmitten on SYN Wednesdays and Sundays. Although they never broadcast from a moving lift, they are handsome, talented, groovy SYNners – and hey, they gave the book a shout out, so they have great taste!

Listen to John’s interview here: omny.fm/shows/art-smitten/john-maziels-interview

P.S: I’ll be on ArtSmitten on Nov 17 at 3pm to chat about the book, kickstarting the media frenzy! Get in 😎🎙️

The Shannon Noll Show

Image from On Dit, University of Adelaide Student Union, 2004.

🔽 2004, The Shannon Noll show on the Student Radio program, Radio Adelaide. @adelaideuniversityunion, I got you. I know how hard it can get. For a short history of student radio in Adelaide, including UniAdelaide, Flinders Uni and UniSA, visit the post on this website: http://ow.ly/E58X50wZYwQ Otherwise, stay tuned for the book to be published! A History of Student Radio in Australia will be fully self-published & independent in the spirit of student radio, and will have some hair on its chin in the spirit of Nolls 😎🤘🔽

The Territory FM story

College Capers 1983, DCC student newspaper

1983, Northern Territory. When Darwin Radio was cool 😎

This is a short history of 8TOP or TOP FM. For southerners, TOP refers to the Top End, which is where Darwin is in the Northern Territory, and is also slang for groovy af radio 🎙 Now called Territory FM, 8TOP was started by Darwin Community College in 1980 (now Charles Darwin University). During that decade, TOP FM had a lot of hep cats and cool kids broadcasting alternative shows on campus.

But the station made a series of programming decisions that led to a complete alienation of students today. 👵🏻👴🏻 In 1992 The Big Spit student newspaper asks “When is a community radio station not a community radio station? When it broadcasts John Laws, 2UE news and horse racing for most of the day.”

These questionable program decisions stacked up in all corners of TOP FM over the years. In correlation, student involvement rapidly reduced from passionate volunteers, to students only completing required components of the journalism course, to virtually no student or youth involvement today. 👎

In 1993, the University and TOP FM added insult to injury. Journalism students had already found themselves disenfranchised as the journalism course was set to be discontinued in 1994. While these students were still studying, works began for parts of the journalism department to be demolished for construction on new TAB studios for TOP FM. This unabashed embrace of corporate content over original youth content never ended. Today, Territory openly broadcasts a “commercial format”. The station management insist they have to go commercial in order to survive financially. Much of the responsibility for this lies at the feet of the university, who shifted gears for 8TOP in the 90s to increase the focus on “sponsorship” and “self-sufficiency”, apparently institutional code words for selling out! 💰💰💰

The move into commercial and politically conservative formatting is clearly a concern for community broadcasters. One wonders, what’s the point of having a community broadcaster if it doesn’t provide diverse, original, alternative content?

But to what extent can we be critical of the struggling station for these decisions to “survive”? It’s easy to criticise, but what other choice was there? Is it our responsibility in bigger cities to support less resourced stations, despite our own financial concerns? Is there a point to community radio if it isn’t alternative? And is alternative content inherently associated with young people? 🤔

If you’re interested in these questions, find out more when A History of Student Radio in Australia is released in 2020, documenting this part of Australian history for the first time. 📻💃🏾🕺🏽🎉

#studentradio #studentmedia #communityradio #independentmusic #alternativemusic #journalism #independentjournalism #radio #broadcasting #independentpublishing #independentscholarship #communityhistory #youthradio #youthmedia #youtharts #studentunion #charlesdarwinuniversity